Bermuda Railway Trail | Attraction Guides | History Hit

Bermuda Railway Trail

Sarah Roller

24 Nov 2020

About Bermuda Railway Trail

The Bermuda Railway Trail is the linear park that is all that remains of the old Bermuda Railway, which ran from 1931 to 1948.

History of the Bermuda Railway Trail

Having banned the use of cars in the early 20th century, the question of internal transportation led to the creation of the Bermuda Railway. The 22-mile-long Bermuda Railway service served Bermuda from 1931 to 1948. During the Second World War it had particularly high usage from American and British military personnel – with the war’s end, the railway’s fortunes began to decline sharply.

Ultimately however, the high maintenance costs and low profits left the railway in a poor state and it was finally closed, to be replaced by a bus service. In 1946, automobiles were finally permitted on the island, changing the need for transport. The remaining rolling stock was shipped to British Guiana, where it continued to be used until the late 1950s.

In 1964, the trail was turned into a trail for walkers and cyclists and in 1986 it was designated as a national park.

The Bermuda Railway Trail today

Today, all that remains is the Bermuda Railway Trail, which provides Bermudians and visitors alike with a wonderful, alternative way to see the country. Visitors can view an array of interesting sites along the trail, including Riddell’s Bay Station and Gibbs’ Hill Lighthouse – reportedly the oldest cast iron lighthouse in the world.

While signposts are not always clear, almost all of the old right of way for the Bermuda Railway Trail (18 of the 22 miles) is still open and is used by walkers, cyclists and other enthusiasts. It’s divided into 9 sections with some gorgeous views and some steep climbs and stairs. Most people cycle the trail as you can cover much more of it in a day, so expect to see a lot of cyclists.

Getting to the Bermuda Railway Trail

The trail can be accessed from multiple points on the island.

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