Minceta Tower - History and Facts | History Hit

Minceta Tower

Dubrovnik, Dubrovnik-Neretva, Croatia

Built in the early 1460s at the height of the Turkish threat, the Minceta Tower is a huge round fort dominating the north-western section of the city and became the symbol of 'the unconquerable city of Dubrovnik.'

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About Minceta Tower

Built in the early 1460s at the height of the Turkish threat as part of Dubrovnik’s fortifications, the Minceta Tower is a huge round fort dominating the north-western section of the city and became the symbol of ‘the unconquerable city of Dubrovnik’.

The Minceta Tower is as recognisable an icon of Dubrovnik as the Eiffel Tower is of Paris. Fans of Game of Thrones may recognise the Minceta Tower as being the House of Undying in Qarth, where Daenerys Targaryen searches for her stolen dragons.

Minceta Tower history

The tower originally constructed as a four-sided fort in 1319 and takes its name from that of the landowners of the time: the Menčetić family. Immediately after the fall of Constantinople to the Turkish Ottoman Empire in 1453, the tower was added to by Italian sculptor and architect Michelozzo di Bartolomeo Michelozzi who built a round tower adapted for warfare with 6 metre-thick walls and protected gun ports.

A disagreement ensued between Michelozzi and local government officials which prompted his return to Italy but the tower was completed by Giorgio da Sebenico, otherwise known as Juraj Dalmatinac who added stability to the bottom of the tower as well as its iconic Gothic crown.

Minceta Tower today

Completed in 1464 and even though the 750 steep, winding steps to the top are a challenge for even the fittest cultural tourist, when you get to the top of Minceta Tower and see the sensational views of the old town of Dubrovnik to one side and out into the Adriatic Sea to the other, you’ll understand that the climb was worth it. You can also visit the museum in the excavated basement.

During the summer another flag is set next to it, so-called Libertas flag annotating the slogan and symbol of the old Dubrovnik Republic, with ‘libertas’ being the Latin word for freedom.

Getting to Minceta Tower

To start the walking tour with fort Minčeta as the first sight on 2 kilometres long walk around Dubrovnik’s fortifying system, the best option is to begin at Pile Gate entrance and head right. Located along the edge of Dubrovnik’s pedestrianised Old Town, the tower is inaccessible by car. You can however find roadside parking outside the Old Town walls.

Via public transport, bus lines 1A, 1B, 3 or 8 from the main bus station and port take you to stop Iza Grada, a 5 minute walk to Minceta Tower.

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